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Alicia García-Herrero

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 Energy

Alicia García-Herrero is the Chief Economist for Asia Pacific at Natixis, a globally renowned investment advisory firm. She also serves as a Senior Fellow at Bruegel, a Belgian Think Tank which focuses on improving the quality of economic policies. Alicia also holds several teaching positions as a Senior Fellow at the East Asian Institute (EAI) of the National University Singapore (NUS), and as an Adjunct Professor at HKUST Business School. Ms. García-Herrero is also a Member of the Council of Advisors on Economic Affairs to the Spanish Government and an advisor to the Hong Kong Monetary Authority’s research arm (HKIMR). Alicia is globally recognized for her efforts and is very active on international media (BBC, Bloomberg, CNBC or CNN) as well as in social media. Alicia was nominated TOP Voices in Economy and Finance by LinkedIn in 2017.

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Alicia García-Herrero

Will China use climate change as a bargaining chip?

With less than four weeks before the start of the 26th U.N. Climate Change Conference of the Parties, or COP26, in Glasgow, China is increasingly the center of global climate policy attention. The country missed the July 31 deadline set by the United Nations to submit new emissions reduction pledges, known as nationally determined contributions (NDCs), ahead of the conference, sparking doubts about its contribution under the Paris Agreement.

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Why China should fear the EU's carbon border tax
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Alicia García-Herrero

Why China should fear the EU's carbon border tax

Environmental Sustainability

After further tightening its net emission target by 2030 from 40% to at least 55% compared to 1990 levels to achieve climate neutrality target by 2050, on July 14 the European Commission released its long-awaited Fit for 55 policy. It contains a dozen proposals directed at upgrading existing climate, energy and transport legislation aimed at reaching such targets. Among the different proposals, a new Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism, or CBAM, is probably the most relevant beyond the EU's borders and, therefore, the most contentious. Expect Beijing to soon start lobbying against the proposal.

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Alicia García-Herrero

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Environmental Sustainability · Carbon Market

Why China should fear the EU's carbon border tax


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