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UK aviation industry calls for more state help to switch to greener fuel

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By illuminem briefings 🌎

· 2 min read


illuminem summarizes for you the essential news of the day. Read the full piece on the Financial Times or enjoy below:

🗞️ Driving the news: The UK airline industry, seeking to reach net zero by 2050, is urging the UK government for more support to avoid falling behind in sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) production and facing higher import costs

🔭 The context: SAF can emit up to 80% less carbon dioxide than traditional fuel and is seen as the primary solution for decarbonizing aviation in the near term
The UK government has pledged £165 million for SAF plants and is considering further support, but industry leaders argue this is insufficient compared to efforts in the EU and US

🌍 Why it matters for the planet: SAF's increased production and usage are crucial for the aviation industry's transition to a lower carbon footprint, aligning with global efforts to combat climate change

⏭️ What's next: The UK government is consulting on a price support mechanism to stimulate SAF investment, but industry leaders urge quicker action to meet the 2030 target and avoid cost spikes for consumers due to reliance on imports

💬 One quote: "Government has a very big role to play, and shouldn’t shy away from it," (Shai Weiss, Virgin Atlantic chief)

📈 One stat: The Phillips 66 refinery in the UK produces up to 20,000 tonnes of SAF annually, far below the 1.2 million tonnes needed by 2030


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