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Block battery eggs coming into UK, say animal welfare groups

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By illuminem briefings 🌎

· 2 min read


illuminem summarizes for you the essential news of the day. Read the full piece here in The Guardian or enjoy below

🗞️ Driving the news: As part of the upcoming Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), the UK government is preparing to allow the import of battery eggs from countries like Mexico
• Animal welfare groups including the RSPCA have objected to this move, citing the cruelty of battery cages, which confine egg-laying hens to cramped conditions

🔭 The context: The UK had banned conventional battery systems in 2012 due to animal welfare concerns

🌎 Why does it matter for the planet: If battery eggs are allowed into the UK as part of the new trade deal, which is set to be signed on July 16, it may undercut local egg producers who adhere to higher animal welfare standard
• It also raises questions about the ethical treatment of animals and the environmental impact of different farming methods

⏭️ What's next: The UK government is facing calls from animal welfare advocates and industry experts to maintain the ban on battery eggs not produced to UK animal welfare standards
• The CPTPP trade deal is also raising concerns about the potential import of low-welfare pork from Canada and other countries

💬 One quote: " The government is starting the gun on a race to the bottom for our animal welfare standards.” (David Bowles, Head of Public Affairs, RSPCA)

Click for more news covering the latest on Animal Welfare

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